Guide Marketing Schools, Marketing Cities: Who Wins and Who Loses When Schools Become Urban Amenities

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  1. Marketing Schools, Marketing Cities: Who Wins and Who Loses When Schools Become Urban Amenities
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Responsibility Maia Bloomfield Cucchiara. Physical description xiv, pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.


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Online Available online. Full view. Course reserve. Green Library. P5 C84 2-hour loan. More options. Find it at other libraries via WorldCat Limited preview.

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Bibliography Includes bibliographical references pages [] and index. Contents A strategic opportunity From "Philthadelphia" to the "Next Great City": revitalization in a postindustrial city Institutions of last resort: crisis, markets, and stratification in Philadelphia's schools Revitalizing schools: the Center City Schools Initiative "This is not an inner-city school!

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Marketing Schools, Marketing Cities: Who Wins and Who Loses When Schools Become Urban Amenities

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  • Very effective study tools especially when you only have a limited amount of time. They work with your textbook or without a textbook and can help you to review and learn essential terms, people, places, events, and key concepts. Elizabeth McGhee Hassrick. The challenge of overcoming educational inequality in the United States can sometimes appear overwhelming, and great controversy exists as to whether or not elementary schools are up to the task, whether they can ameliorate existing social inequalities and initiate opportunities for economic and civic flourishing for all children.

    This book shows what can happen when you rethink schools from the ground up with precisely these goals in mind, approaching educational inequality and its entrenched causes head on, student by student. Raudenbush, and Lisa Rosen argue that effectively meeting the challenge of educational inequality requires a complete reorganization of institutional structures as well as wholly new norms, values, and practices that are animated by a relentless commitment to student learning.

    They examine a model that pulls teachers out of their isolated classrooms and places them into collaborative environments where they can share their curricula, teaching methods, and assessments of student progress with a school-based network of peers, parents, and other professionals. Within this structure, teachers, school leaders, social workers, and parents collaborate to ensure that every child receives instruction tailored to his or her developing skills. Cooperating schools share new tools for assessment and instruction and become sites for the training of new teachers.

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    Parents become respected partners, and expert practitioners work with researchers to evaluate their work and refine their models for educational organization and practice. The authors show not only what such a model looks like but the dramatic results it produces for student learning and achievement. The result is a fresh, deeply informed, and remarkably clear portrait of school reform that directly addresses the real problems of educational inequality.

    Christopher A. And for years this question has played out ferociously in the debates about how we should educate our children.

    From the growth of vouchers and charter schools to the implementation of No Child Left Behind, policy makers have increasingly turned to market-based models to help improve our schools, believing that private institutions—because they are competitively driven—are better than public ones. For decades research showing that students at private schools perform better than students at public ones has been used to promote the benefits of the private sector in education, including vouchers and charter schools—but much of these data are now nearly half a century old.

    Drawing on two recent, large-scale, and nationally representative databases, the Lubienskis show that any benefit seen in private school performance now is more than explained by demographics.

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    ‎Marketing Schools, Marketing Cities Apple Books’ta

    Private schools have higher scores not because they are better institutions but because their students largely come from more privileged backgrounds that offer greater educational support. After correcting for demographics, the Lubienskis go on to show that gains in student achievement at public schools are at least as great and often greater than those at private ones. Even more surprising, they show that the very mechanism that market-based reformers champion—autonomy—may be the crucial factor that prevents private schools from performing better.

    Alternatively, those practices that these reformers castigate, such as teacher certification and professional reforms of curriculum and instruction, turn out to have a significant effect on school improvement. Despite our politics, we all agree on the fundamental fact: education deserves our utmost care. The Public School Advantage offers exactly that.

    By examining schools within the diversity of populations in which they actually operate, it provides not ideologies but facts.